Land Speculator Michael Winer Wins 2009 Rubber Dodo Award

January 5th, 2010

Third annual Rubber Dodo Award: Michael Winer, Land Speculator

And the Dodo Award unfortunately had to choose one more winner last year. If you are following The Dodo Blog on Twitter you already know that The Center for Biological Diversity announced Michael Winer, portfolio manager for the giant real-estate investment firm Third Avenue Management, LLC (“TAREX”), as the winner of its third annual Rubber Dodo Award for : “His Wall St. Firm Pushing Largest Developments in California and Florida Imperiling Dozens of Endangered Species, Including Condors on Tejon Ranch“. Not an easy work, but there is always a monster to do such things.

Winer is deserving of the 2009 award for his leadership of TAREX, the largest stockholder in companies developing the largest pieces of private land remaining in Southern California and Florida. These regions are also home to some the highest numbers of endangered species in North America. In California, TAREX is pushing the Tejon Ranch Company to pave over thousands of acres of federally designated California condor habitat. In Florida, TAREX is pushing the St. Joe Company to flood tens of thousands of acres of the Florida Panhandle with high-end developments.

“Under Winer’s money-obsessed leadership, TAREX has become the poster child for unsustainable, endangered-species-killing sprawl,” said Adam Keats, director of the Center’s Urban Wildlands Program. “He specializes in finding massive, remote estates far from urban centers and turning them into a sea of condos, malls, golf courses, and resorts. There is good reason that even Wall Street commonly calls TAREX a ‘real-estate vulture’.” Read the rest of this entry »

Dodo – Pomellato

January 5th, 2010

Dodo boutique in Bergamo

Do you remember the DoDo in Bruges post? Well, with the kind help of Allison, now I know that Dodo shop is actually a DoDo boutique by Pomellato:

Dodo’s story started far far away. Dodo is the name of that funny feathered fellow who used to live happily on the island of Mauritius – until extinction caught up with him. But, as happens in only the very best stories, after many, many years, Dodo has come back to life and now he lives all over the world because he has become a symbol of nature that needs protection and of Pomellato’s sweetest collection of jewelry. The Dodo pendants are happy company of animals who speak the language of feelings and emotions. Each Dodo reveals a little bit of who we are and what we want to say. It is a gift that can speak for us if we are a little shy. To give as a gift, or to collect, because Dodo doesn’t like being alone and is always on the lookout for new friends. Read the rest of this entry »

Dodie Dodo Demonstrates a Dastardly Double-Jump

January 5th, 2010

Dodie Dodo Demonstrates a Dastardly Double-Jump by S.britt.

Here’s my contribution for the second anniversary exhibition of Treeson, created by the mighty talented Bubi Au Yeung: flickr.com/photos/bubi […]
My piece is a six-layered print, my third such experiment using the Print Gocco. Unfortunately, this particular time the Gocco inks printed a bit dark for my liking, so I had to lighten them up a tad in Photoshop. I guess with Gocco, you never really know how they’re gonna turn out until you finish printing the last separation. I think from now on I should stick to prints under three or four colors until I master this new (to me) technology. I’d love to know if anybody’s tried using other types of inks aside from Riso (such as Versatex) and what where their results. I find that the Gocco inks are a bit expensive (for the amount of ink you get) and difficult to mix to create the exact color and opacity I’m looking for.

Announce baby

January 1st, 2010

Announce baby (Faire part bebe) by Marty-Crouz on deviantART

Announce baby (Faire part bebe) by Marty-Crouz on deviantART.
I thought that lovely baby dodo would it be very appropriated to celebrate a new year.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Christmas Dodo Papercraft

December 23rd, 2009

A long long time ago Stefan Scheer from Düsseldorf sent me an e-mail with a very nice surprise:

Hello, Dodoblog!

Inspired by the dodo´s sad story and the will to keep it´s memory alive we sent out about 3.000 christmasdodos on Christmas.

We hope you like them!

So, he sent me 4 pages in PDf with the dodo story and pages to make my own Christmas dodo. My German isn’t very good (=it’s really really bad), but the instructions to make your own it are easy, and you can make it today. You just need to grab the PDF with the pages Christmas Dodo papercraft here.

That’s a little (re-passed) gift to all the dodos fans around the world be able to celebrate  holidays with our so much loved bird. I hope you enjoy it!

Happy Holidays to all!

Running Slowly

June 10th, 2009

Running Slowly

Running Slowly by Leah Palmer Preiss, aka Curious Art. I loved it!

According to my trusty 1878 Chambers’s Encyclopedia of Universal Knowledge, “The birds were easily killed, being wholly unable to fly, and running slowly. Their speedy extinction after the islands began to be visited and settled, is thus easily accounted for.”

Maybe it was the shoes?

Acrylic on text & map of Mauritius, 4×5″

Dead Dutch Authors as Dodo Birds

June 10th, 2009

Dead Dutch Authors as Dodo Birds

Dead Dutch Authors as Dodo Birds: paper mache dodo birds made from the writing of obscure, dead, Dutch authors, 6″ long, $1500. By Alain Douglas Park.

The way of the digital dodo

June 10th, 2009

scanned dodo renderedAn early version of the scanned dodo rendered by project research technician Abby Drake and students in Leon Claessens’ lab.

From PhysOrg, The way of the digital dodo: The laser light glowed brilliant red, forming a moving line as it bounced information from the dodo’s bones back into the high-tech scanner sitting on a tripod on the Museum of Comparative Zoology’s (MCZ) fifth floor.

Again and again, the red line traced the contours of the skeletal bird, one of just a handful of complete skeletons of one of the world’s most famous cases of human-caused extinction.

The flightless bird, about the size of a large turkey, was native to the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius. It became extinct in the mid- to late-1600s from a combination of human hunting, habitat destruction, and predation by introduced animals, including rats, cats, pigs, and dogs.

The laser’s tracings were creating a 3-D digital model of the skeleton, compiled as part of a joint effort between the MCZ’s ornithological collection, overseen by Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Scott Edwards, and Holy Cross College biologist Leon Claessens, an assistant professor whose doctoral work at Harvard and familiarity with the MCZ’s collections led to the collaboration. Claessens received his doctorate in 2006.

The National Science Foundation-funded, three-year effort aims to create 3-D digital models of each species represented in Harvard’s collection of 12,000 bird skeletons. It will make those digital models available on the Internet for researchers around the world. The collection’s digitization will not only vastly expand access to the collections for researchers who can’t afford to travel to Cambridge, it will also make analysis of the specimens far more rapid, using powerful engineering software that creates thousands of data points on each bone that can be manipulated, measured, and used in calculations.

“This project will be useful for people studying the basic morphology of birds,” Edwards said. “In this era of genomics, the size and shape of bones is still very important.”

Claessens, who has been scanning with a group of his students since the “Aves 3D” project got under way in August, said much of the effort is aimed at disarticulated bones of specimens, so that the scanner can image the entire bone, including the ends and surfaces that might not be accessible in an assembled specimen. Researchers interested in the shape and size of a particular bone across different species will be able to call up those bones digitally, rather than traveling to individual museums with calipers, pencil, pad, and camera, as would be required today. Those interested in other aspects of anatomy can manipulate the bones digitally, even reassembling the bird if needed.

Keep reading on PhysOrg.

Alice’s dodo by Maxim Mitrofanov

June 9th, 2009

Alice in Wonderland illustrated by Maxim Mitrofanov

Alice in Wonderland illustrated by Maxim Mitrofanov

Alice in Wonderland illustrated by Maxim Mitrofanov

Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland illustrations by Maxim Mitrofanov, translated by N. Demurovoy from the LiveJournal Таpirr. (via ofellabuta – NSFW)

Dodo Napkin

June 9th, 2009

Dodo napkin
Dodo napkin by Allison.